• 8 year old girl

  • Clumsy impression, seemed to fall

  • DCD as a working diagnosis

Casus: DCD

Tinneke’s story

Tinneke is an enthusiastic 8-year-old girl who progressively experienced more difficulty during sports and gymnastics classes at school compared to her peers. Similar problems were also noted during the dance lessons.

The parents also noted then that Tinneke seemed to fall more often, bumped into obstacles and often gave an awkward impression. Tinneke was registered and examined two years ago in consultation with the teacher, the school and the parents. The biggest shortcomings at Tinneke were in the field of gross and small motor skills, learnability and planning actions (praxie). Tinneke was admitted to the center with a suspicion of DCD as a working diagnosis.

During the past school year, intensive training was given to the skills that Tinneke encountered the most difficulties (balance, body scheme, general coordination, movement praxis, etc.). However, the latest test results showed little progress and at the end of this year, DCD was diagnosed in consultation with the physician and the multidisciplinary team involved.

The main request for help from the parents is to improve Tinneke’s independence. Planning tasks (both cognitive and motoric) is certainly central to this. Tinneke herself would like to participate again in the sports lessons at school and dance lessons in the weekend. She also wants to improve her general movement skills so that she feels less excluded on the playground.

Goals

  • Promote gross motor skills

  • Stimulating balance skills (dynamic and static)

  • Promote general body coordination

  • Continue working around the body scheme

  • Practicing complex movement tasks

  • Improving visual spatial insight

  • Offering tools and techniques to stimulate independent planning of tasks and movements

Integration of Matti inside therapy

How can Matti support Tinneke?

Whack-a-light

See how the game is played and where the settings are adjusted to suit your patient.

  • Performance: unipodal or bipodal jumping.

  • Exercise progression can be achieved by increasing the Mole Distance and increasing the Hold Time. In this way, the jump distance (strength) is improved and the dynamic stability after a jump is trained.

  • Decreasing the Mole Timeout Time can help improve and accelerate movement planning.

  • Increasing the Mole Size makes exercise easier, while a decrease requires more movement accuracy.

Balance Orchestra

See how the game is played and where the settings are adjusted to suit your patient.

  • Design: Bipodal position with lateral and forward orientation of the feet

  • This game mainly exercises the static balance. By checking the Continuous Mode the game can be made a lot more difficult.

  • By increasing the Weight Range, control of the weight over both supports can be better practiced. This further stimulates static balance skills and targeted movement control. A higher Weight Range will expect the center of gravity to move further to either side. By adjusting the Target Range, any increase in the weight range can be practiced gradually.

  • Increasing the Target Time on the one hand makes it easier to reach the goal, but requires more control of the center of gravity at the goal. Especially when the Weight Range is at a higher level, this control becomes more difficult.

Twister

See how the game is played and where the settings are adjusted to suit your patient.

  • Performance: All four buttons are used to practice general body coordination.

  • The main way to increase the difficulty is to increase the Maximum Button Distance. This value should provide a good challenge without making the game impossible.

  • To promote insight into the body scheme, the Multiplayer can be ticked, for example, more account must be taken of the placement of limbs and obstacles.

Balance beam

See how the game is played and where the settings are adjusted to suit your patient.

  • Execution: These exercises can be performed both forward and backward.

  • With Generalized Steps checked you can choose between Level 1 and 2 to determine the difficulty.

  • The Width can be progressively reduced to practice dynamic balance and coordination.

Avoid the monster

See how the game is played and where the settings are adjusted to suit your patient.

  • Execution: This game can be performed standing or in a four-point position (very difficult but good practice for general body coordination).

  • The Monster Timing and Monster Behavior can be adjusted to make the exercise more difficult or easier. In this way, the estimation and movement planning can be practiced.